Chiba City Museum of Art
saya-do hall

Exhibition schedule

2019.4 - 2019.12 EXHIBITIONS

SP Exhibition

Ukiyo-e Prints from the Mary Ainsworth Collection Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College

Saturday, April 13 − Sunday, May 26, 2019


Mary Ainsworth, an American woman who visited Japan during the Meiji Period in 1906, was captivated by the beauty of Ukiyo-e, and made a collection of works chiefly by Katsushika Hokusai and Utagawa Hiroshige. That collection is now housed in the Allen Memorial Museum of Oberlin College - Ainsworth’s own alma mater. 200 pieces have been chosen from the over 1500 Ukiyo-e prints in the collection. This exhibition marks their first return home to Japan.

CCMA Collection

Exhibition from the Collection: Masterpieces from the Sanso Collection Japanese Paintings collected by Peter F. and Doris Drucker

Saturday, April 13 − Sunday, May 26, 2019


We introduce ink paintings from the Muromachi to Edo Periods that were collected by the “Father of Modern Management”, Peter Drucker, and later entrusted to Chiba City Museum of Art.

CCMA Collection

Itabashi Art Museum x Chiba City Museum of Art − Exhibition of Japanese Art: The CHITABASHI Art Museum Dream!?

Saturday, June 1 − Sunday, June 23, 2019


Itabashi Art Museum, devoted to spreading the allure of Japanese antique art, in a collaboration with us of our dreams! What if the two art museums were to become one − CHITABASHI…!? The idea being that it allows you to view the cream of both collections. Have your fill of the splendid flower and bird paintings of Shibata Zeshin and Okamoto Shuki that fascinated people from the end of Edo into the Meiji Period. Or trace the lasting lineage of the Rinpa School of Art beginning with Tawaraya Sotatsu, Ogata Korin, Sakai Hoitsu, Suzuki Kiitsu to Ikeda Koson and Yamamoto Koitsu. A precious opportunity within a duration of just 23 days, so don’t miss it!


SP Exhibition

Kitaoji Rosanjin―The Renaissance of Japanese Ceramics: The Path to Contemporary Art

Tuesday, July 2 − Sunday, August 25, 2019


Kitaoji Rosanjin (1883-1959) started out in the fields of calligraphy and engraving, but in 1922, when in his late 30s, he turned his attention to creating ceramics as “kimono for food”, emanating from his interest in food from nature. It surpassed mere dishware-making; by exploring the country’s tradition surrounding the tea ceremony that had been at the centre of Japanese culture since the Middle Ages, Rosanjin, at a stroke, became the leader of a ceramics’ renaissance. This exhibition, while centring on the work of Rosanjin, adds works by his contemporaries, from Kawakita Handeishi, Ishiguro Munemaro, Arakawa Toyozo to Yagi Kazuo, and will also display alongside them examples of the Chinese, Korean and Japanese antique ceramics that they studied. You will be able to look across the rich achievements of Showa-period ceramics that are the foundation of modern ceramics, and from their very origins and into the future.

CCMA Collection

Exhibition from the Collection: “He was Indeed an Amazing Person” −Centring on the Work of Teshigahara Sofu and Munakata Shik?

Tuesday, July 2 − Sunday, August 25, 2019


To coincide with the Kitaoji Rosanjin Exhibition, here we introduce works from our collection, chiefly by Teshigahara Sofu and Munakata Shiko who had history of exchange with Rosanjin.

SP Exhibition

Mucha and Japan / Japan and Orlik in commemoration of the 100th Anniversary of Japan-Czech Republic Relations

Saturday, July 7 − Sunday, October 20, 2019



 

CCMA Collection

Exhibition from the Collection:

Saturday, July 7 − Sunday, October 20, 2019


 

SP Exhibition

【mé】: Obriviously, no one can make heads nor tails.

Saturday, November 2 − Sunday, December 28, 2019


This is a large-scale private exhibition from modern art activity team【mé】that is drawing much attention in Japan and abroad, in which works unfold and attract a real sense of the uncertainty of the world among people using expressions that transform the space on a large scale − and is the first of its kind to be held at the museum. As shown by the Chibanian strata found in Chiba Prefecture from a reversal in the Earth’s magnetic fields, and the geology behind it, it is upon a succession of cataclysms of nature, the cause of which are still unclear, that we have built our world of the “everyday” on the Earth’s outermost surface. In this exhibition, in addition to the exhibits, the whole of the facility, including visitors’ movements and situational awareness, will be rearranged as a large-scale installation work to lure people to the museum as a contrived “everyday”. The dynamic exhibition space of an accumulation of various situations will surely encourage new perceptions of the world of “everyday” that we overlook as so ordinary